AARP
AARP views the opportunity to engage with other leaders and influencers in business, government and trade unions, key nongovernmental organizations, members of academia, civil society and media as critical to shaping the broad implications of aging.

Longevity is reshaping the future of the world. Societies all over the globe are experiencing the same transformational development as the population ages.

This year, AARP again serves as a knowledge partner with the OECD, ensuring that aging, and its varied related issues, gets exposure across sectors in dialogues that address key international economic and social topics.  AARP views the opportunity to engage with other leaders and influencers in business, government and trade unions, key nongovernmental organizations, members of academia, civil society and media as critical to shaping the broad implications of aging.

Through this relationship, AARP is also proud to serve as a sponsor of this year’s OECD Forum, taking place in Paris, France on June 2-3, and that AARP’s Editorial Director Myrna Blyth is featured as a speaker on preparing for our future.

In this edition of The Journal, co-sponsored by the OECD, we feature insights from key speakers at the OECD Forum 2015, which is entitled Investing in the Future: People, Planet, Prosperity. We invited speakers from different sectors of society to respond to the following:

By 2030, the number of people aged 60 and over will exceed the number of children aged ten or under. And by 2050 will exceed 2 billion. Keeping in mind the theme of OECD Forum 2015 "Investing in the Future: People, Planet , Prosperity," what do you see as the key opportunities in aging?

 

Monika Queisser, Head of Social Policy, at the OECD headlines this edition. Ms. Queisser shares insights from a major OECD project focusing on the two mega-trends of population aging and rising inequality.

Dr. Burkhard Gnärig, co-founder and Executive Director of the International Civil Society Centre, examines the growing field for engagement for civil society as a result of population aging. He considers aging “a driver of both disruption and innovation, and ultimately as a source of opportunity for our sector.”

Farah Mohamed, CEO of G(irls)20 notes that “despite the advances that have been made, on a global scale, women continue to be more economically disadvantaged, experience more violence, earn less and are underrepresented in positions of leadership in all sectors.” In her article, Ms. Mohamed emphasizes the importance of economically engaging girls and women at every age and stage.

Pieter van de Glind, co-founder of ShareNL - the Dutch knowledge and network organization - discusses the role of the 50+ in the collaborative economy. He states that older adults today are already a part of the sharing economy and there is currently a growing number of online marketplaces specifically geared toward this ‘asset heavy’ cohort with a ‘wealth of underutilized but valuable knowledge and experience.’

Myrna Blyth, Editorial Director of AARP, discusses the positive strides women have experienced since the United Nations’ Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing twenty years ago and stresses what is most needed at this time is a positive view of aging—both for society and for ourselves.

As Ms. Blyth states,  “Meeting the challenges of an aging world, will require all parts of society, including governments and businesses, to work together in innovative ways.” 

 
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